Eric Kunnen\’s GRCC Blog


Student Laptop Poll – Are Students Allowed to Use them in the Classroom?
September 28, 2007, 4:03 pm
Filed under: Work Activities

After creating the Cook Hall Student Poll, I wondered about the use of laptops by our students. Quite often, throughout my travels around campus I have noticed an increasing number of students studying, accessing Blackboard, looking up friends on Facebook, etc. on their own laptops.

I’ve also heard faculty talking about students that have been taking their laptops with them to classes.

I wondered. How many students actually have a laptop. So I set up the following poll on our Blackboard Community System Portal. Here are the results:

Question: Do you have a laptop? Do you use it in the classroom?

  • No, I don’t have a laptop = 466 / 38.17%
  • Yes, I have a PC laptop but do not use it in the classroom = 386 / 31.61%
  • Yes, I have a PC laptop and use it in the classroom = 244 / 19.98%
  • Yes, I have an Apple laptop and use it in the classroom = 63 / 5.16%
  • Yes, I have an Apple laptop but I do not use it in the classroom = 62 / 5.08%

While not scientific, this means that out of approximately 1200 students, more than 62% have personal laptops. Interestingly roughly 36% of the students indicated that they HAVE a laptop BUT don’t use the laptop in the classroom. I wonder why that is? Do our faculty tell them that they can’t use their laptop for class? Is that perhaps a detriment to their learning?

What are your thoughts? Post your comments below.


4 Comments so far
Leave a comment

[…] Anyway, it was an excellent read.  The article highlighted some work from the Educause Center for Applied Research which conducted a survey of 27,864 students at 103 two- and four-year colleges and universities.  I pulled some interesting information from there article and I’d like to highlight them here in this blog post.  In fact, the article talks about how even though students have laptops, they often don’t take them to class, which is exactly what I found and posted in a quick poll that I ran on our Blackboard Community System.  I blogged about that here. […]

Pingback by Students and THEIR Use of Technology « Eric Kunnen’s GRCC Blog

“While not scientific, this means that out of approximately 1200 students, more than 62% have personal laptops. Interestingly roughly 36% of the students indicated that they HAVE a laptop BUT don’t use the laptop in the classroom. I wonder why that is? Do our faculty tell them that they can’t use their laptop for class? Is that perhaps a detriment to their learning?”

Sounds like a topic for your next poll! Are you allowed to bring laptops into your classes? Bringing a laptop to the classroom is not a detriment to learning unless it’s used inappropriately!

Comment by gbrand

Check the scientific research:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VCJ-4MX4VNP-1&_user=27181&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000001858&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=27181&md5=c506d2db7d80a6b47116716eea0a571b

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VCJ-4MX4VNP-1&_user=27181&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000001858&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=27181&md5=c506d2db7d80a6b47116716eea0a571b

Do the numbers lie? Or are students negatively affected by the almost unavoidable temptation to surf the web, chat, shop, etc.? I’m ready to entirely ban the use of laptops in the classroom, and now I have the research to demonstrate that I’m doing it not for my own benefit, but for the benefit of the students.

Comment by Jason

Thanks for sharing these data with me Jason. I wasn’t able to access the details of these research articles that were posted in 2006. I am most interested in the research methods as they appear to be evaluating large lecture hall situations… where I would imagine that the laptop isn’t used by the faculty member or the students in a purposeful manner. So I still propose that there can be no question of the value of the laptop if it is approached deliberately by a faculty member and used purposefully in instruction.

Comment by ekunnen




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: